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Somalia

Somali government exports banana to Middle east and Europe

Mareeg.com-The Federal Government of Somalia has exported the highest number of banana in a decade from Mogadishu seaport to Kuwait and United Arab Emirates.

The Minister for Agriculture Abdi Ahmed Mohamed Baafo said that the farmers have jointly exported to outside markets so as to restore the trade relations of Somalia with the world.

 

The exported bananas was harvested from Bal’ad, Afgoye, Awdegle and Janale districts of Middle Shabelle and Lower Shabelle regions.

Somalia banana industry was one of the flourishing and largest exporter in East Africa, the production ceased during the 1991 civil strife in the country.

Between 1913 to 1997 the industry was partly revived with the exports to Europe and Middle East   see also

Economy of Somalia  From extract of  Wikipedia,

According to the CIA and the Central Bank of Somalia, despite experiencing civil unrest, Somalia has maintained a healthy informal economy, based mainly on livestock, remittance/money transfer companies and telecommunications.[3][4] Due to a dearth of formal government statistics and the recent civil war, it is difficult to gauge the size or growth of the economy. For 1994, the CIA estimated the GDP at $3.3 billion.[5] In 2001, it was estimated to be $4.1 billion.[6] By 2009, the CIA estimated that the GDP had grown to $5.731 billion, with a projected real growth rate of 2.6%.[3] According to a 2007 British Chambers of Commerce report, the private sector also grew, particularly in the service sector. Unlike the pre-civil war period when most services and the industrial sector were government-run, there has been substantial, albeit unmeasured, private investment in commercial activities; this has been largely financed by the Somali diaspora, and includes trade and marketing, money transfer services, transportation, communications, fishery equipment, airlines, telecommunications, education, health, construction and hotels.[7] Libertarian economist Peter T. Leeson attributes this increased economic activity to the Somali customary law (referred to as Xeer), which he suggests provides a stable environment to conduct business in

The Central Bank of Somalia indicates that the country’s GDP per capita is $333, which is lower than that of Kenya at $350, but better than that of Tanzania at $280 as well as Eritrea at $190 and Ethiopia at $100. About 43% of the population live on less than 1 US dollar a day, with about 24% of those found in urban areas and 54% living in rural areas.[4] As with neighboring countries, Somalia’s economy consists of both traditional and modern production, with a gradual shift in favor of modern industrial techniques taking root. According to the Central Bank of Somalia, about 80% of the population are nomadic or semi-nomadic pastoralists, who keep goats, sheep, camels and cattle. The nomads also gather resins and gums to supplement their income.[4]

Agriculture is the most important economic sector. It accounts for about 65% of the GDP and employs 65% of the workforce.[7] Livestock contributes about 40% to GDP and more than 50% of export earnings.[3] Other principal exports include fish, charcoal and bananas; sugar, sorghum and corn are products for the domestic market.[9] According to the Central Bank of Somalia, imports of goods total about $460 million per year, and have recovered and even surpassed aggregate imports prior to the start of the civil war in 1991. Exports, which total about $270 million annually, have also surpassed pre-war aggregate export levels but still lead to a trade account deficit of about $190 million US dollars per year. However, this trade deficit is far exceeded by remittances sent by Somalis in the diaspora, which have helped sustain the import level.[4]

With the advantage of being located near the Arabian Peninsula, Somali traders have increasingly begun to challenge Australia‘s traditional dominance over the Persian Gulf Arab livestock and meat market, offering quality animals at very low prices. In response, Persian Gulf Arab states have started to make strategic investments in the country, with Saudi Arabia building livestock export infrastructure and the United Arab Emirates purchasing large farmlands.[10] Somalia is also a major world supplier of frankincense and myrrh.[11] Additionally, fishing fleets from Europe and Asia have reached commercial fishing agreements in the northern Puntland region.[8] more on   Wikipedia

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